Malaysia My Destination : Info about Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
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Kuala Lumpur : Malaysia Capital - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Putrajaya : Federal Territory - Malaysia
Selangor : Central Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Terengganu : East Coast Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Kelantan : East Coast Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Pahang : East Coast Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Johor / Johore : Southern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Malacca / Melaka : Southern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Negeri Sembilan / The Nine State : Southern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Kedah (Langkawi) : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Penang / Pulau Pinang : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Perak : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Perlis : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Sabah : East Malaysia / Malaysian Borneo - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Labuan (Federal Territory) : East Malaysia / Malaysian Borneo - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Sarawak : East Malaysia / Malaysian Borneo - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
 
 
 
LOCAL CUISINE / DELICACY

Chinese Delicacy

| Overview | Tropical Fruits | Vegetarian Delights | Malay Delicacy | Chinese Delicacy |

| Indian Delicacy | Nyonya Delicacy | Portuguese Delicacy | Ethnic Delicacy (Sabah & Sarawak) |

 
 

Chinese fare is generally mild, stir-fried and best savoured when it is piping hot. Lunchtime favourites include rice, served with meat and vegetable side dishes. Noodles are another versatile and staple favourite. One can choose either fried, soup or curried noodles.

 

Over time, adaptations and variations of classic Chinese cuisine were made to suit Malaysians? discerning taste. Creative touches were given by adding local ingredients, which led to the birth of delicious new recipes that are uniquely Malaysian.

 

Visitors will find a plethora of Chinese dining outlets in Malaysia, from restaurants that serve expensive delicacies such as shark?s fin or bird?s nest soup to hawker stalls that sell char kuay teow (fried flat noodles) and bah kut teh (pork bone soup). Chinese vegetarian meals are also easily available. In most towns, visitors will find ?kopitiams?, or traditional Chinese coffee shops that exude an old-world ambience and charm. Typically, a kopitiam serves food and drinks that are exclusively Malaysian Chinese. It is a place where friends meet up and exchange news over a plateful of boiled eggs, thick slices of toast generously drizzled with butter and kaya (coconut jam), and washed down with a strong cup of authentic, locally brewed coffee. The quaint d?or and homemade dishes make dining here an interesting experience.

 

 

The main festival for the Chinese community is the Lunar New Year. It is a time for lion dances, firecrackers, family gatherings and handing out of Mandarin oranges and ang pow (little red packets filled with money). The highlight of the festivities is on the eve of the New Year, when family members from near and far come together for a Reunion Dinner to rekindle family ties and enjoy a glorious feast. The dishes that are normally prepared for the reunion dinner each present a symbolic meaning. Dumplings are served to imply wealth as they look like ancient gold nuggets while whole fish or chicken represents prosperity and completeness. Noodles suggest longevity and yee sang is the symbol of prosperity.

 

Even oranges and tangerines convey the meaning of long-lasting relationships, happiness and a good future.   The Mid-Autumn or Moon Cake Festival is another interesting celebration for the Chinese community. Celebrated on the fifteenth day of the eighth Lunar month, this festival is marked by lantern processions by children and adults alike. During this time, Malaysian Chinese exchange moon cakes with friends and family as an expression of their best wishes.   For visitors who are keen to know about the culture and traditions of the Chinese, the Chinese History Museum in Sarawak offers a fascinating insight.

 
 

Char Kuay Tiew

A plateful of sizzling char kuay teow is easily one of the most popular items from the Chinese kitchen. Kuay teow, or a type of flat noodle, is fried over high heat with lip-smacking ingredients such as prawns, chicken, cockles, chives as well as light and dark soy sauce. It is topped with a generous amount of crunchy bean sprouts. Duck?s eggs are sometimes added to give it that extra flavour. As customers queue up for this scrumptious dish, the cook deftly stir-fries the contents in a huge iron wok. The most famous and sought-after char kuay teow is found on the famous gourmet island of Penang. However, the dish is available everywhere from roadside stalls and pasar malam (night markets) to food courts in shopping complexes and five-star hotels.

 
 
 

Curry Mee

Curry mee is a dish that is uniquely Malaysian. It is mainly a bowl of either yellow noodles or vermicelli (beehoon) served in a spicy curry made from curry powder, coconut milk and a host of other spices and ingredients. It contains fried tofu and meat (prawns, cuttlefish or chicken, or all). Curry mee is garnished with shredded chicken meat, crunchy bean sprouts and mint leaves, and perfected with a dollop of sambal.

 
 

Hainanese Chicken Rice

Hainanese chicken rice is one of the most common and economical rice meals available in Malaysia. Originating from the island of Hainan in China, the dish can now be found at virtually every food stall and eatery all over the country. It is a simple and tasty rice dish that gives both carbohydrate and protein. The succulent chicken is boiled or steamed with a rich stock of chicken bones, or barbequed. Sometimes, the chicken is first dipped in ice-cold water to produce a smooth texture. The rice is the true essence of this dish. It is cooked in chicken stock, with salt, garlic and ginger. Hainanese chicken rice is garnished with cucumber, scallions, cilantro and accompanied by a bowl of chicken broth. A savoury sauce made of chilli, garlic, ginger and lime juice completes the meal.

 
 
Yong Tau Fu

This is a dish of Hakka origins, which has gained popularity in Malaysia. Yong tau foo literally means ?stuffed bean curd?. Essentially, the stuffed tofu containing fishballs, crabsticks, vegetables and wantan are served in clear soup and can be eaten just as it is or with noodles or rice. It is also delectable when dipped in a specially-made chili sauce and sweet brown gravy. Aside from restaurants, yong tau foo can also be found at Malaysian night markets.

 
 
Joo Hoo Eng Chai (Cuttlefish Salad)

Looking for an appetiser or just a light but delicious snack? Try joo hoo eng chai, or more popularly known by its Malay name, sotong kangkong. This succulent salad is uniquely Malaysian and is not easily found anywhere else, well except maybe in the neighboring country of Singapore. A popular hawker fare, it is made of cuttlefish, water convolvulus or water spinach (kangkong) as it is sometimes called, a sweet prawn-based sauce and sprinkled with ground peanuts or toasted sesame seeds.

 
 
Yee Sang

Yee sang or raw fish salad is synonymous with the Chinese New Year celebration in Malaysia. Dubbed the ?prosperity dish?, yee sang is made from a m?ange of thin slices of raw fish, jellyfish, shredded vegetables, herbs, spices and oil. The best part of having yee sang is when it is tossed and mixed together by family members in a warm and joyous atmosphere, while cheering ?Low Hei!? (let?s dig in!). The tossing of yee sang is believed to bring good for tune and wealth in the upcoming year. Besides strengthening bonds between family members, yee sang also symbolises happiness and longevity.

 
 
Claypot Rice

The claypot rice, or sa po fan in the Chinese language, is a simple meal which can be found across Asia. At its most basic, this meal is rice infused in dark soy sauce and topped with diced chicken, Chinese sausage, mushrooms and other ingredients. It is cooked in an ear then vessel over charcoaled fire, which gives it the distinct flavour. It is said that the best par t of this dish is getting to the nutty, slightly charred crust at the bottom and sides of the claypot. This popular dish can be found at the many Chinese restaurants and food courts around the country.

 
 
Moon Cake

Every fifteenth day of the eight lunar month, Chinese people from all over the world celebrate the Mid-Autumn or Moon Cake Festival. Moon cakes are also called the ?reunion cake? as family members reunite and savour this sweet treat. Moon cake is a traditional Chinese pastry shaped to resemble the full moon. During this time, Chinese restaurants and supermarkets are filled with moon cakes containing a variety of fillings - from traditional fillings such as lotus paste and red bean to more creative and imaginative flavours such as taro, chocolate, coffee, cheese, custard, green tea, pandan and durian. There are also other savory options such as yam paste with chicken, or ham. It usually comes with salted duck?s egg yolk in the centre which represents the full moon.

 
 
Popiah

A popular snack, popiah refers to deep-fried spring rolls. Wrapped in a paperthin cr?e, popiah contains a tasty filling made of turnip (locally known as sengkuang or jicama), bean sprouts, French beans, carrots and prawns. Crisp lettuce leaves, shredded omelette and chopped peanuts are added to give it a crunchy texture and extra taste. For the health-conscious, popiah can also be served fresh without frying.

 
 
 

| Overview | Tropical Fruits | Vegetarian Delights | Malay Delicacy | Chinese Delicacy |

| Indian Delicacy | Nyonya Delicacy | Portuguese Delicacy | Ethnic Delicacy (Sabah & Sarawak) |

Chinese Delicacy
LOCAL CUISINE / DELICACY