Malaysia My Destination : Info about Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Kuala Lumpur : Malaysia Capital - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Putrajaya : Federal Territory - Malaysia
Selangor : Central Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Terengganu : East Coast Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Kelantan : East Coast Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Pahang : East Coast Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Johor / Johore : Southern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Malacca / Melaka : Southern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Negeri Sembilan / The Nine State : Southern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Kedah (Langkawi) : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
  Welcome
 
  Kedah Map
  Alor Setar Map (State Capital)
 
  Culture & Heritage
  Culinary & Wellness
 
  PLACES OF INTEREST :
 
  Alor Setar (State Capital)
 
  Fun & Leisure
  The Carnivall Waterpark
  Ulu Legong Hot Springs
  Pulau Payar Island / Marine Park
 
  Nature & Parks
  Recreation & Sports
  Nature Attractions
  Sungai Sedim River
 
  Historical & Heritage Sites
  Tourist Attraction
  Rumah Merdeka
  Lembah Bujang / Bujang Valley
 
 
 
  About Langkawi Island
  Travel Guide
  Getting To Langkawi
 
  Langkawi Map
 
  Langkawi Geopark
  The First In South East Asia
  Geological History
  Eco Tourism
  Kilim Geoforest Park
  Bat Cave / Gua Kelawar
  Mat Cincang Cambrian
  Datai Bay Beach
  Lake Of Pregnant Maiden
 
  Duty-free Shopping
  Dining & Entertainment
 
  International Events
  Yacht & Boating Destination
 
  TOURIST ATTRACTION
 
  Kuah Town
  Langkawi Cable Car
  Beach Holidays & Island Cruise
  Rich Island Culture
  Nature Attraction
  Must Visit Places
 
Penang / Pulau Pinang : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Perak : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Perlis : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Sabah : East Malaysia / Malaysian Borneo - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Labuan (Federal Territory) : East Malaysia / Malaysian Borneo - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Sarawak : East Malaysia / Malaysian Borneo - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
 
 
 
LANGKAWI : KEDAH - NORTHERN REGION OF PENINSULAR MALAYSIA

LANGKAWI GEOPARK : Eco Tourism

 
 

Conservation For Biodiversity For The Sustainable Development Of Eco-Tourism In Langkawi

 

Overall, diversity of flora and fauna in Langkawi is as high, if not higher, than other islands of equal size. Previous work recorded a total of 16 small and big mammal species in Langkawi. This research has added 3 more species of Muridae. For bats, 20 species were recorded earlier, by by using harp traps and mist nets, 5 more species have been added for Langkawi. The total of bat species in Langkawi is now 25 (21 insectivorous bats and 4 fruit bats). From a total 44 species of mammals known to occur in Langkawi, only the wild boar (Sus scrofa) is considered a big mammals, while the largest carnivore is the Malay civet (Viverra tangalungga). There was a total of 15 species of amphibians recorded. From a total of 19 species of non-volant mammals, 11 species are either protected or totally protected under the wildlife and Protection Act, while none of the bat or amphibian species is protected. Some of the areas identified as high in diversity are Mat Cincang, Datai-Andaman and the Rimba ilmu. Other potential areas yet to be assessed are Kilim, Mount Raya and Pasir Tengkorak.

 

Langkawi Island, which covers an area of 478.5 sq km, is one of the largest among many islands surrounding Peninsular Malaysia. There are many other small islands surrounding Langkawi and the major ones are Pulau Dayang Bunting, Pulau Payar and Pulau Singa. Langkawi Island, which is inhabited by over 72,000 people, has a unique geological history dating back to 500 million years. The outcome of the past geological processes has diversified the existing geological settings that range from bizarre rock formations and numerous caves, such as the mystical Gua Cerita, Gua Langsiar and Gua Kelawar. Geological history of the islands is believed to have influenced the fauna and flora composition of Langkawi.

 

Similarly, the species composition of wildlife on other islands surrounding the Peninsular Malaysia (which is part of the Sunda Shelf) is influenced by the growth and recession of continental glaciers during the Pleistocene, which caused changes to the sea level and temperature (Heaney 1986). Sea level was 80 m or more lower than the present levels at least four times during the Pleistocene (Fairbanks 1989). The greatest drop in sea level occurred during the middle Pleistocene, about 160,000 years ago, when sea level reached 160 m below present levels (Gascoyne et al. 1970).

 

By then, the islands of the Sunda Shelf, which included Langkawi, were connected to each other with the mainland, allowing free migration of various types of forest-dwelling species, including mammals. During the period 35,000- 25,000 BP, major recession of the continental glacier resulted in the flooding of the Sunda Shelf, and increased the sea level until it reached approximately the present level (Fairbank 1989). Because there was no land-bridge between Langkawi and the mainland, it was believed that Langkawi became isolated from its faunal source, especially terrestrial species (Heaney 1986).

 
 

Langkawi Island, which is inhabited by over 72,000 people, has a unique geological history dating back to 500 million years.?

 

The influx of animals of Langkawi may have originated from Peninsular Malaysia and Thailand. Peninsular Malaysia has at least 208 species of mammals within 12 orders and 32 families (Medway 1983). The most diverse order is Chiroptera (bats) represented by 87 species, followed by Rodentia (rodents; 55 species) and the Carnivora (carnivores; 30 species). Among families, the richest are the common bats (Vespertilionidae; 32 species), followed by horseshoe bats (Rhinolophidae; 26 species), squirrels (Sciuridae; 25 species) and rats (Muridae; 25 species). Theoretically, when Langkawi was connected to the mainland, the faunal species richness was the same, but it started to dwindle as soon as the island became isolated (Brown 1986).The existing fauna of Langkawi is the result of a combination of processes of extinction and immigration that might have taken place since the last Pleistocene (Heaney 1986).

 
 

ORIENTAL PIED-HORNBILLS

Anthracoceros albirostris

 

 

In Malay, they are known as ?Enggang Belulang? Also residents of Langkawi, adult pied hornbills are about 60 cm long (from head to tail), gnera11y black in colour with white tipped wing feathers and black and white tail. The bill and casque is yellow. They are found in the mangroves and the forest.

 

The gentle beauty of the jungle

The Oriental Pied-Hornbill is one of the forest?s most gentle and stunning creatures. These majestic creatures are mostly found in deep parts of the forest but they are found almost everywhere in Langkawi. Hornbills are commonly found in deep jungles as they need large trees for nesting. Horn- bills are considered as sacred creatures of the jungle by some tribes in Borneo who deem them fairies of the forest. Oriental Pied-hornbills move in packs of 3 to 8. Sometimes these birds will move in a big group of about 30 at a time. They are very shy and spend most of the time on treetops. They are faithful to their one mate until they die.

 

Breeding behavior

Like most hornbills, Oriental Pied-hornbills nest in a hollow part of a tree. Before the eggs hatch, the male builds a mud wall in the opening, leaving only a small hole through which the male transfers food to the female and the chicks. This mud wall is very hard as it takes a long time for the female to break through it. Oriented Pied hornbills normally lay 1 to 2 eggs at a time. You might be wandering where do all the droppings of these birds go? Astonishingly, the chicks are known to shoot their droppings out of the nest. When the chicks and the female are too big to fit in the nest, they will come out together. In some cases, the female will break the wall where she will emerge first, whereby the chicks will close back the entrance and break it open only when they are ready to leave the nest.

 

Feeding behavior

Hornbills are omnivorous, eating fruit, insects, snails and small animals. The male regurgitates the food, which consists of a mixture of bananas, worm and lizard among other things, and delivers it into the nest twice to five times a day.

 

Threats to this species

Massive tree cutting and clearing of land is the biggest contributor to the destruction of nesting grounds for most birds.

 
 
 
 
LANGKAWI GEOPARK : Eco Tourism
LANGKAWI : KEDAH - NORTHERN REGION OF PENINSULAR MALAYSIA