Malaysia My Destination : Info about Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Kuala Lumpur : Malaysia Capital - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Putrajaya : Federal Territory - Malaysia
Selangor : Central Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Terengganu : East Coast Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Kelantan : East Coast Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Pahang : East Coast Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Johor / Johore : Southern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Malacca / Melaka : Southern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Negeri Sembilan / The Nine State : Southern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Kedah (Langkawi) : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Penang / Pulau Pinang : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Perak : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Perlis : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Sabah : East Malaysia / BORNEO MALAYSIA - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Labuan (Federal Territory) : East Malaysia / BORNEO MALAYSIA - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
  Welcome
 
  Labuan Map
   
  People & Culture
  Recreation & Sports
 
  Dining & Local Delicacy
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  PLACES OF INTEREST :
 
  Nature Attraction
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  Islands & Beaches
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Sarawak : East Malaysia / BORNEO MALAYSIA - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
 
 
 
LABUAN - EAST MALAYSIA / BORNEO MALAYSIA

DINING & LOCAL DELICACY

 
 

Seafood lovers will enjoy eating out in Labuan. Fresh seafood such as fish, prawns, crabs, lobsters, squids and shellfish are delivered to the doorsteps of restaurants daily and are transformed into scrumptious Malay, Chinese and Western seafood dishes.

 

Labuan has a weekend market in the city centre, just in front of Wisma Oceanic and perpendicular to Jalan OKK Awang Besar and Jalan Perkhidmatan.

 

Labuan has a weekend market in the city centre, just in front of Wisma Oceanic and perpendicular to Jalan OKK Awang Besar and Jalan Perkhidmatan. Here, everyone in Labuan gathers to trade and sell the flowers they planted in their gardens, the baskets they weaved in their spare time, and the food they made in their kitchens, with local food such as punjung, jelurut, tapai, lamban and many more.

 

Other than the standard affairs of local food at the Labuan weekend market, there is also the Labuan farmers? market to check out. The smell of salted fish gathered in molehills is overwhelming, and other dried condiments neatly stacked atop one another in vacuum-sealed packets. Here you can find rare items like the authentic sambal sticks/slabs, made in Labuan and those shipped in from Sabah. They are made in the most organic way possible; no preservatives or added flavours ? just a lot of smashing in the sambal pounder.

 

One way to differentiate such sambals from the ones you buy at the supermarket, is that these sambals you could still see the teeny eyes of the dried shrimps in the sticks and slabs. You can also find more sago slabs, the main ingredient for the Brunei-Malay cuisine Ambuyat ? sold here, as well as ragi balls, big and small, for the known tapai. The Labuan weekend market is open every Saturday and Sunday from 7AM till 2PM at Jalan OKK Awang Besar with a large variety of agriculture products on sale, such as fruits, vegetables, fresh spices, fish, dried shrimps, dried seafood, and much more.

 
 

LOCAL DELICACY

 

The most popular local dessert is the coconut pudding. Unique to Labuan and not found anywhere else, it is made from coconut water as well as jelly and steamed. You should also try desserts such as the Jelurut, Pinyaram, Katilapam, Calak, Madu Kasirat, Kuih Apam, Kuripit, Kuih Punjung, Kuih Pais Manis, Kusui, Kelupis, Lamban, Ambuyat and Ampap. These delicious desserts originate from Brunei and Sabah. Another local favourite is the barbequed chicken wing, which is skewered and barbequed over charcoal fire.

 
 

PUNJUNG

Made from rice flour, they are little cone-sized desserts with green jelly-like fillings wrapped in banana leaves. The making process may be simple ? what could be harder than making the batter and filling them into the coned banana leaves? ? but it is not. When we learned how to make punjung from my elderly, it took five failed attempts before getting it right. The batter has to be in the right texture; it cannot be too soft or it?ll just drool out of the leaf.

 

JELURUT

Wrapped in lined nipah leaves are bundles of sin in the littlest forms. A delicacy derived from Brunei ? known there instead as selurut or celurut, it is made from rice flour, sugar, coconut milk and other basic ingredients. Jelurut is the fattiest and sweetest local food of all the Labuan dessert spread. A tourist, like me, would be ignorant and just peel the leaf off the filling and sink my teeth into the jelly texture. It is only later when I found out that the right and more fun way to eat jelurut is to twist the flat bottom to squeeze out the food. Jelurut is usually green in colour, but has picked up other kinds of flavours through time, such as durian and yam.

 

LAMBAN

Like little fingers of goodies. Although they may be small, they are still able to fill up your tummy. Made from the pulut rice, lamban tastes like the Malay?s ketupat or the Chinese?s rice dumplings. Firstly, the rice is steamed before wrapping in little cylinder forms of coconut leaves, and then put through the steaming for another time. The sweet lamban is eaten with a dip in the peanut sauce that creates a small spicy kick for the taste palettes.

 

TAPAI

Quite a common delicacy found even in the Peninsular Malaysia. It is alcoholic dessert made from pulut rice, water and ragi, a fermented ingredient that is the most important in making tapai. The making procedure is fairly simple, but tapai is one of the local delicacies available that has the most superstitions revolving around it. Apparently, tapai's can only be made by individuals, instead of groups, and it is best made in the middle of the night, when everyone is asleep and the maker has a lesser chance of being disturbed.

 

Even a question as simple as ?ah, you?re making tapai?? could ruin the outcome of the dessert! Ancestors believed that when you speak, spits of your saliva might end up in the mixture, which might make the dessert go sour. Also, tapai makers have to be in the ?purest? form before attempting to make the dessert. Women having ?that time of the month? are not allowed to make tapai, in fear that the food would turn out red! And one must ?cleanse? oneself before making the food, such as taking a thorough shower or something as simple as cleaning your hands with soap.

 
 
 
DINING & LOCAL DELICACY
LABUAN - EAST MALAYSIA / BORNEO MALAYSIA