Malaysia My Destination : Info about Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Kuala Lumpur : Malaysia Capital - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Putrajaya : Federal Territory - Malaysia
Selangor : Central Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Terengganu : East Coast Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Kelantan : East Coast Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Pahang : East Coast Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Johor / Johore : Southern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Malacca / Melaka : Southern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Negeri Sembilan / The Nine State : Southern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Kedah (Langkawi) : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
  Welcome
 
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  PLACES OF INTEREST :
 
  Alor Setar (State Capital)
 
  Fun & Leisure
  The Carnivall Waterpark
  Ulu Legong Hot Springs
  Pulau Payar Island / Marine Park
 
  Nature & Parks
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  Sungai Sedim River
 
  Historical & Heritage Sites
  Tourist Attraction
  Rumah Merdeka
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  About Langkawi Island
  Travel Guide
  Getting To Langkawi
 
  Langkawi Map
 
  Langkawi Geopark
  The First In South East Asia
  Geological History
  Eco Tourism
  Kilim Geoforest Park
  Bat Cave / Gua Kelawar
  Mat Cincang Cambrian
  Datai Bay Beach
  Lake Of Pregnant Maiden
 
  Duty-free Shopping
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  International Events
  Yacht & Boating Destination
 
  TOURIST ATTRACTION
 
  Kuah Town
  Langkawi Cable Car
  Beach Holidays & Island Cruise
  Rich Island Culture
  Nature Attraction
  Must Visit Places
 
Penang / Pulau Pinang : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Perak : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Perlis : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Sabah : East Malaysia / Malaysian Borneo - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Labuan (Federal Territory) : East Malaysia / Malaysian Borneo - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Sarawak : East Malaysia / Malaysian Borneo - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
 
 
 
LANGKAWI : KEDAH - NORTHERN REGION OF PENINSULAR MALAYSIA
LANGKAWI GEOPARK : Bat Cave / Gua Kelawar
 
 

GUA KELAWAR / BAT CAVE

 

Gua Kelawar, named as such because it is home to hundreds of insect bats. There were three species of bats that sought refuge in Gua Kelawar. Malaysia is at the centre of palefropical bat species diversity with 118 species (20 species of Megachiroptera and 97 species of Microchiroptera; Corbet & Hill 1992; Kingston et al. 2003). From this total, 38 species have been reported as cave-dwelling species (Medway 1965).They include five species of fruit bats (Family: Pteropodidae), three species of sheath-tailed bats (Emballonuridae), one species of hollow-faced bat (Nycteridae), two species of false vampire bats (Megadermatidae), 10 species of horseshoe bats (Rhinolophidae), nine species of roundleaf horseshoe bats (Hipposideridae), six species of common bats (Vespertilionidae) and two species of free-tailed bats (Molossidae).

 

In Gua Kelawar there are three insectivorous bats: Hipposideros armiger, Hipposideros larvatus and Miniopterus medius. The great roundleaf bat, Hipposideros armiger (Hipposideridae), is an open-space and edge/gap foraging insectivorous species, which is distributed very widely in the Peninsular Malaysia, and can be found roosting in caves. It has also been found in a montane forest.

 

The intermediate roundleaf bat, Hipposideros larvatus (Hipposideridae), is also a cave bat with a larger distribution range than that of H. armiger, in that its distribution includes Peninsular Malaysia and some parts of Borneo. In Peninsular Malaysia, it has been reported in Langkawi Island, Penang, Tioman and Aur Island. The third species is the Southeast Asian bent-winged bat, Miniopterus medius (Vespertilionidae). It has been recorded at Maxwell Hill of Perak, and Fraser Hill of Pahang. M. medius is the only species identified in this study that was not in the list of cave bats in Peninsular Malaysia reported by Medway (1965).

 

M. medius often roosts in large colonies in caves and has the smallest distribution range among the three species found in this cave. Among the three species, H. armiger (forearm 88-98 mm) is the largest, H. larvatus is intermediate in size (FA 57-61 mm), while M. medius is the smallest (FA 35-42 mm). Caves have been used as roosting sites for bats because they provide stable home with ambient temperature and relative humidity. This is important because due to their small size and highly vascularized flight membranes, bats face enormous challenges in regulating temperature and evaporative water loss.

 

The Kilim area is dominated by limestone of the Setul Formation, believed to have been formed about 400 million years ago (during Ordovician-Silurian time), based on the occurrence of fossils in the Kilim area, Pulau Langgun and its surrounding islands including Pulau Tuba. Weathering processes that have been going on in the limestone area have developed various karst morphologies, including the Gua Kelawar. Gua Kelawar is located at the north-east of Langkawi (6o24.102?N 99o51.544?E), within the mangrove swamps of Sungai Kilim in Kisap Forest Reserve.

 
 

It is one of the famous tourist attractions in this part of the island.Tourists flock the Sg. Kilim to see the cave and the bats up close. Gua Kelawar consists of two caves. The western cave has a floor area of aabout 270 m2 with a low roof (1-3 m) trending northeast (NE-SW). The most interesting and important feature is the occurrence of old shells on the cave wall and roof. Radiocarbon dating has indicated that the shell is 5252 + 110 years old, The present altitude shows that the sea level about 5000 years ago was 2 m higher than the present day sea-level. The second cave is bigger, having a floor area of about 750 m2, its roof reaching 10 m high and trending north-northwest (NNW-SSE). Both caves have an opening facing to the north. A lot of interesting features and structures occur in the caves including stalactite, stalagmite, and rock blocks.

 

The largest species of bat is H. armiger, represented by an estimated total of 150 individuals, followed by H. larvatus (860 individuals), and M. medius (60 individuals). Roosting conditions may influence bat distribution and abundance and many species of cave bats have different preferences for the temperature and humidity in roosting caves. This has strong implications for conservation because a species that can tolerate a broad range of roost humidity or temperatures can occupy a larger geographic range than that with limited tolerance. Colony size is also strongly related to mean minimum monthly temperatures and rainfall. Thus, many factors contribute to the roosting behavior of bats in caves.

 

Other observations on this roosting cave are all three bat species tend to roost in the darkest part of the chamber, ii) most of the established colonies were a mixture of all three species, and iii) the three species in the established colonies were positioned in a circle, with the largest species (H. armiger) at the middle, surrounded by H. larvatus and followed by M. medius at the periphery. All the observations suggest some degree of interspecific spatial partitioning of roost resources/spaces. Dominance of the largest species (H. armiger) at the centre of the roosting community (probably also the highest portion of the cave ceiling) might be because the wall surface was more suitable for vertical clinging, thus displacing the two smaller species to the steeper walls of the cave. Since H. armiger is larger and heavier, it would probably require more height/space to pick up some momentum during drop-off prior to flight. Further studies on the microhabitat and temporal distribution and abundance of these bats are needed to fully understand the roosting patterns of bats in this cave.

 
 
 
LANGKAWI GEOPARK : Bat Cave / Gua Kelawar
LANGKAWI : KEDAH - NORTHERN REGION OF PENINSULAR MALAYSIA