Malaysia My Destination : Info about Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Kuala Lumpur : Malaysia Capital - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Putrajaya : Federal Territory - Malaysia
Selangor : Central Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Terengganu : East Coast Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Kelantan : East Coast Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Pahang : East Coast Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Johor / Johore : Southern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Malacca / Melaka : Southern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Negeri Sembilan / The Nine State : Southern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Kedah (Langkawi) : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Penang / Pulau Pinang : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Perak : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
  Welcome
 
  Perak Map
  Ipoh Map (State Capital)
 
  History & Traditional Performance
  Shopping & Dining
 
  PLACES OF INTEREST :
 
  Nature & Adventure Travel
  Cultural Destination
  Fun & Excitement Holiday
  Heritage Sites
  Hot Springs & Waterfalls
  Island Holiday
  Museums & Galleries
   
  Ipoh (State Capital):
 
  General Info
 
  Tourist Attraction
  Gunung Korbu Forest Reserve
  The Lost World Of Tambun
   
  Gerik:
 
  General Info
 
  Tourist Attraction
  Rafflesia Wonderland
  Royal Belum Forest Reserve
  Temenggor Lake
   
  Gopeng:
 
  General Info
 
  Gua Tempurung (Cave)
  Kampar River White Water Rafting
   
  Kuala Gula:
 
  General Info
 
  Tourist Attraction
   
  Kuala Kangsar:
 
  General Info
 
  City Attraction
  Deer & Ostrich Farm
  Keris & Parang Making
  Tekad Benang & Labu Sayong
   
  Lumut:
 
  General Info
 
  Pulau Pangkor Island
  Pulau Pangkor Laut Island
  Pulau Sembilan Island
  Teluk Batik Beach
   
  Pasir Salak:
 
  General Info & Attraction
   
  Taiping:
 
  General Info
 
  Bukit Larut
  Kota Ngah Ibrahim
  Malaysia Oldest Prison
  Matang Mangrove Forest Reserve
  Old Clock Tower
  Perak Museum
  Rustic Kuala Sepetang
  Taiping Lake Gardens
  Uniquely Zoo Taiping
   
  Tapah:
 
  General Info
 
  Kuala Woh Recreational Park
  Lata Iskandar Waterfall
  Lata Kinjang Waterfall
  Sungai Klah Hot Springs
 
Perlis : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Sabah : East Malaysia / Malaysian Borneo - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Labuan (Federal Territory) : East Malaysia / Malaysian Borneo - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Sarawak : East Malaysia / Malaysian Borneo - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
 
 
 
PERAK - NORTHERN REGION OF PENINSULAR MALAYSIA
TAIPING : Matang Mangrove Forest Reserve
 
 

MATANG MANGROVE

FOREST RESERVE

 

One of the best places to get a close view of mangrove habitat is at the Matang Mangrove Forest Reserve. Gazetted as a forest reserve in 1908, it is the single largest mangrove forest and mudflat ecosystem in Peninsular Malaysia. Internationally recognised as a sustainable managed mangrove swamp since the early 1900s. The forest reserve covers approximately 40,711 hectares along a 52km long and 13km wide stretch of the northern coast of Perak. The reserve includes 34,769ha of productive forest and 5,942ha of unproductive forest Some 95% of the mangroves are tidal swamp dominated by Rhizophoraceae, and in all makes up 40% of the peninsula?s total mangrove area.

 

About 80% of this area is sustainable-yield production forest, consisting mainly of the Bakau Minyak and Bakau Kurap species. The Matang forest reserve is watered through daily flooding brought in by the tide. Major rivers that flow through the Matang forest include Sungal Gula, Sungai Kelumpang, Sungai Selinsing, Sungai Sangga Besar, Sungai Sepetang, Sungai Jaha, Sungai Terung and Sungai Jarum Mas. The estuaries within the forest reserve range in width from two to four km and the larger ones are Kuala Gula-Kuala Kelumpang, Kuala Selinsing-Kuala Sangga Besar, Kuala Larut-Kuala Jaha, and the Kuala Trong-Kuala Jarum Mas estuaries.

 

The Matang Mangrove Forest is an important site for coastal migratory water birds as well as a large portion of migratory forest birds. According to the Malaysian Nature Society (MNS), as many as 43000 to 85,000 birds have been estimated to use the forest during their migration. Furthermore, a study made by the Department of Wildlife and National Parks in 1995 has identified up to 75 species of birds that frequent the Matang mangrove forest. Thanks to the diversity of plant and animal species (including several species of migratory birds) within the mudfiat ecosystem, Matang Mangrove is an invaluable source of research and education, especially for students of ecology, forestry, fishery, botany or zoology. In a step by the state-government to further educate the public on the importance of the mudflat ecosystem and the sustainable yield basis of Matang Mangrove, a 300m stretch of walkway and a Nature Education Centre has been set up and managed by the Larut/Matang Forestry Department. Fast becoming an eco-tourism attraction, accommodation is available for visitors in the form of chalets in Taman Paya Laut complex belonging to Forestry Department.

 
 

WHERE CHARCOAL IS MADE

 

Visiting the Matang Mangrove Forest Reserve will not be complete without stopping by one of the many nearby charcoal kilns. Over 348 charcoal kilns operate in the Matang mangroves, making this place the countrys largest producer of mangrove charcoal. Making charcoal is time consuming and hard work. After the mangrove trees or bakau minyak are harvested from the forest reserve, they are cut into roughly 1.6m logs and the bark is stripped to reduce excess moisture. The logs, from the Rhizophora Apiculata or Rhizophora Mucronata trees are then transported to the kilns by boats and then packed and sealed in a 7m tall igloo-shaped kiln. The process of making charcoal is essentially the carbonisation of wood through the removal of moisture. In order to do this, the logs are left to bake inside the kiln for eight to 10 days at a temperature of 83?C, and then baked for another 12 to 14 days at 220C. Finally, the logs are left to cool for another eight days before the kiln is unsealed. This whole process of gradually heating and then cooling takes about a month, depending on the moisture within the harvested logs.

 

Each kiln, which usually can be used for eight years, is able to produce around 10 tonnes of charcoal from 40 tonnes of mangrove in a single burn. Once a dying trade due to the popularity of conventional gas cooking, the charcoal trade resurged with a new demand arising from Japan. The kilns of Matang have now become a tourism attraction. Visitors on their way to or from the Kuala Sepetang Matang Mangrove Forest Reserve can be seen stopping for guided tours.

 

 
 
 
TAIPING : Matang Mangrove Forest Reserve
PERAK - NORTHERN REGION OF PENINSULAR MALAYSIA