Malaysia My Destination : Info about Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
  Welcome
  Getting To & Around Malaysia
 
  Peninsular Malaysia Map
  East Malaysia / Borneo Map
 
  Fasting Month / Season In Malaysia
Celebrations & Festivals
  Special Interest Holiday
  Planning A Trip
 
  Local Cuisine / Delicacy
 
  Overview
  Tropical Fruits
  Vegetarian Delights
 
  Malay Delicacy
  Chinese Delicacy
  Indian Delicacy
  Nyonya Delicacy
  Portuguese Delicacy
  Ethnic Delicacy (Sabah & Sarawak)
 
Arts & Culture
Shopping
 
Malaysian Legends
 
  My Second Home Program
Health & Medical Tourism
Homestay Program
Education Tourism
 
  Cruise Holiday
  Golfing Paradise
  UNESCO Heritage Sites
 
Places Of Worship
 
Romantic Honeymoon
Theme Parks
 
Highland Retreats
Island Holiday
Beach Holiday
Nature & Adventure
National Parks
   
Scuba Diving
Bird Watching / Birding
Exotic Equestrian Escape
Great Fishing
Sailing / Yachting / Boating
 
 
Kuala Lumpur : Malaysia Capital - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Putrajaya : Federal Territory - Malaysia
Selangor : Central Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Terengganu : East Coast Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Kelantan : East Coast Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Pahang : East Coast Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Johor / Johore : Southern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Malacca / Melaka : Southern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Negeri Sembilan / The Nine State : Southern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Kedah (Langkawi) : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Penang / Pulau Pinang : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Perak : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Perlis : Northern Region Of Peninsular Malaysia - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
Sabah : East Malaysia / Malaysian Borneo - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Labuan (Federal Territory) : East Malaysia / Malaysian Borneo - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
Sarawak : East Malaysia / Malaysian Borneo - Tourist Attraction and Destination Guide
 
 
 
 
LOCAL CUISINE / DELICACY

| Overview | Tropical Fruits | Vegetarian Delights | Malay Delicacy | Chinese Delicacy |

| Indian Delicacy | Nyonya Delicacy | Portuguese Delicacy | Ethnic Delicacy (Sabah & Sarawak) |

 
 

Centuries of European colonial conquests and intermarriages with the locals have given birth to a new community known as Malaysian Portuguese. The enticing fusion of the East and West is evident in many areas, such as customs, traditions, architecture, languages,

arts and of course, cuisine.

 

Enclaves of the Malaysian Portuguese community can be found in the state of Melaka, particularly in the areas of Ujung Pasir and Tengkera. Although modern and progressive, the Malaysian Portuguese are proud custodians of their customs and traditions.   The Portuguese settlement in Ujong Pasir is also the site of the famous Portuguese Square, dubbed ?Mini Lisbon?. It is where the Malaysian Portuguese community come together for fun and fiesta during festivals such as Festa San Pedro and Festa San Juang. Regular cultural shows are also held, displaying an array of colours and traditional costumes. One of the most interesting performances is the Branyo, a lively Portuguese dance.   Wherever you turn in Melaka, you will find remnants of the colonial era. Among the most famous is the A? Famosa fort, also known as Porta de Santiago. It is one of the only surviving Portuguese fortresses in Southeast Asia. Further away is the Dutch Square, a popular tourist spot with prominent landmarks such as the redcoloured Stadthuys and Christ Church.

 

Gain an insight into Melaka?s amazing past at the Light & Sound Show in Dataran Pahlawan. It is an entertaining show that reenacts the history with lights and sound effects, as well as narrations.   Malaysian Portuguese speak a language known as Creole Portuguese. It is a mix of Portuguese, accented with Malay, Indian, Chinese, English and even Arabic words. Some Malaysian Portuguese fare have Malay names such as laksa, satay goreng (fried satay), acar (pickle), assam, kobis gulung (rolled cabbage) and sambal.   Just like their language, Malaysian Portuguese food is a mix between traditional Portuguese recipes, with traces of Dutch, British, and local ingredients. Influences of Malay, Chinese, Indian and Nyonya styles of cooking can also be seen.

 

Malaysian Portuguese have a liking for spicy food, particularly chilli. Their love for fiery food is evident in their most popular dish, the curry debal which is characterised to be searingly spicy due to the generous use of dried chillies.   Being largely a seafaring community, a culture that traces back to their Portuguese ancestry, the cuisine and condiments of the Malaysian Portuguese are mainly seafood-based. Among the popular dishes are acar ikan (pickled salt fish), tuna mornay (a baked tuna and cheese casserole), prawn bastador, and their signature cincaluk (fermented shrimp sauce).

 

Just like the Nyonya ladies, the Malaysian Portuguese women are tremendously proud of their culinary heritage and they tend to guard their recipes, which are regarded as family heirloom, zealously. So, if you ever come across a Portuguese restaurant or luckier still, are invited for dinner by a Malaysian Portuguese family, brace yourself for a fiery gastronomic adventure!

 
 
  Devil's Curry

 

Devil?s curry, also called curry debal, is as hot and fiery as its name suggests. Cooked in a rich blend of spices with a liberal amount of chilies, this dish will spark up one?s appetite and leave the taste buds tingling. In the Malaysian Portuguese community, this dish is usually served during Christmas feasts and on special occasions. And, they believe that it is not devil?s curry until the one eating it breaks out in sweat. Now, that?s one hell of a curry!

 
  Itik Teem

Itik teem is basically a salted vegetable and duck stew. Duck meat is cooked with pickled cabbage, sour plum, tamarind and tangerine peel.   In the original non-halal recipe, this dish is made of pork legs or spare ribs and cooked with spices such as black pepper and star anise. Sherry or Snow Pear Wine is added to give it an extra zing. Itik teem is sometimes regarded as Nyonya fare but when it comes to Melaka?s cuisines, no one can really tell for sure as some dishes transcend cultural borders. Possessing a milder taste, itik teem is definitely a refreshing break from the regular hot and fiery Malaysian Portuguese fare. It is a special dish for both cultures, normally served during Chinese New Year reunion dinners in the Peranakan household, and Christmas in the Malaysian Portuguese home.

 
  Chicken Vindaloo

In the authentic Portuguese recipe, the main ingredient is pork, cooked with red wine and garlic. Over time, the recipe has been modified to suit local taste by substituting the pork with chicken, lamb or mutton. More ingredients and spices such as ginger, coriander, paprika and cumin are added, along with a potent amount of chillies.   Vindaloo is very popular among Malaysians. They are also in fact, a staple feature in Indian restaurants all over the world. This dish is strongly associated with Indian cuisine, particularly Goan, as Goa was a Portuguese colony.

 
 
 

| Overview | Tropical Fruits | Vegetarian Delights | Malay Delicacy | Chinese Delicacy |

| Indian Delicacy | Nyonya Delicacy | Portuguese Delicacy | Ethnic Delicacy (Sabah & Sarawak) |

LOCAL CUISINE / DELICACY