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JOHOR - SOUTHERN REGION OF PENINSULAR MALAYSIA

PLACES OF INTEREST :

NATURE & NATIONAL PARKS - Endau-Rompin National Park

Kampung Peta - Wildlife & Floral

 
 

WILDLIFE

KAMPUNG PETA ACCESS POINT

Endau-Rompin National Park

 

Until about the mid-1970s wildlife was abundant in the Endau-Rompin Johor National Park. It is reported that elephants, deer and mouse deer would enter Jakun villages and large numbers of migrating bearded pigs were killed at river crossings. Inrecent times, following road construction and logging, the population size of many spices has declined considerably. However, the Park still supports one of the most significant faunal assemblages in Peninsular Malaysia and many of its elements are rare elsewhere.

 
 
REPTILES

During the Malaysian Heritage and Scientific Expedition, the number of herpetofauna (reptiles and amphibian) recorded includes at least one caecilian, 26 species of frogs, 14 snakes, nine lizards and three turtles (two of which, Heosemys spinosa and Notochelys platynota, are considered to be rare).

 

 

Snakes : 37 Species

- Paradise Tree Snake

- Red Tailed Racer

- Reticulated Python

Lizard : 36 Species

- Monitor Lizard

- Gonocephalus Sp.

- Kuhl?s Flying Gecko

- (Ptychozoon Kuhli)

Frogs : 57 Species

- Wallace?s Flying Frog

- Malayan Giant Toad

- Leaf Litter Frog

 
 
MAMMALS

During the Malaysian Scientific and Heritage Expedition, there were 62 species of mammals recorded and these include most of Malaysia?s larger carnivores (meat eaters) and ungulates (hoofed animals) and at least 21 species of bats (including the Ridley?s or Singapore roundleaf horseshoe bat Hipposideros ridleyi which is endangered). In particular, the Park was believed to be one of the last places in the world with a viable breeding population of the Sumatran rhinoceros Dicerorhinus sumatrensis. This is the rarest large mammal in Malaysia and it is of high conservation significance. Estimated that there were approximately 25 rhinos remaining in the entire Johor/Pahang Endau-Rompin area. It is a solitary, very shy animal that is known to favour the more remote forest areas in the upper reaches of the Sg. Endau, Sg. Selai and Sg. Segamant. However, in a recent survey by PERHILITAN, there could be less than 4 individuals in the Park.

 
 

 

Small Mammals:

- Pangolin

- Malayan Porcupine

Primates:

- Slow Loris

- Dusky Leaf Monkey

- White Handed Gibbon

Large Mammals:

- Malayan Tapir (Tapirus Indicus)

- Malayan Sambar (Cervus Unicolor Equinus)

- Bearded Pig (Sus Barbatus)

- Sumatran Rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus Sumatrensis)

 
 
INVERTEBRATES

The Park?s invertebrates are generally of less management concern than its vertebrates but among the species of significance are:

  • A crab Geosesarma malayanum is the only know decapod crustacean in the world that lives inside a pitcher plant.

  • A trap ? door spider Li[histus endauensis which is endemic to the Park.

  • The local butterfly fauna (179 species ) is also of special interest because of the number of rare and threatened species present. Among the most spectacular of these is the Raja Brooke birdwing Trogonoptera brookiana mollumar and Common birdwing Troides helena Cerberus.

 
 
FISH

The fish fauna in the Park?s streams and rivers is very diverse and 43 species were recorded during the Malaysian Heritage and Scientific Expedition. the Asian Boneytongue or Kelisa ? Scleropages formosus, which is a very popular and highly valued aquarium fish, occurs in the Sg. Endau. Because of commercial pressure and habitat destruction, this fish species is now becoming increasingly rare throughout the Peninsula. In the Park it is of particular management significance because the local villagers collect the green Kelisa fry for sale. Many other popular and potential aquarium fishes requiring effective protection also occur in the Park?s rivers. These include Vaillantella maassi, one of the rarest freshwater fishes found in Peninsular Malaysia and two rare species of rasboras (Rasbora heteromorpha and R. elegans).

 
 
BIRDS - 256 Species
 

 
 

FLORAL

KAMPUNG PETA ACCESS POINT

Endau-Rompin National Park

The park has a significant number of species that are restricted in distribution either to the Park itself or to the southeastern region of Peninsular Malaysia. At least eight plant species (including Calamus endauensis ? a rare species of rattan, Phyllanthus watsonii ? a riverside shrub, Didissandra kiewii ? a herb, Didymocarpus spp. ? a herb, Loxocarpus tunkui ? a relative of the African viole and, Licuala dransfieldi ? a palm tree) are found in the Park and nowhere else.

 
 
PHYLLANTHUS WATSONII

Phyllanthus watsonii grows along the Sungai Endau and its tributaries and nowhere else in the world. It is well adapted to the conditions where it lives on rapids and along the edge of the river, where it is often rooted in the water. Its root system is extensive and clings tenaciously to the substrate so that it is not dislodged by floods. It branches from the base so that if its stems are broken off, they are replaced by new ones. Plants like P. watsonii, that can withstand strong water current and floods, are called rheophytes. The Sungai Endau has a wealth of rheophytes and an advantage of the Endau-Rompin expedition to scientists was the opportunity to study plants with such a highly restricted distribution.

 
 
DIDISSANDRA KIEWII

Didissandra kiewii of the African violet family is the most stunningly beautiful herb at Endau-Rompin. Its trumpet-shaped deep purple flowers are black inside and its leaves are beautifully variegated with a crinkled texture. The expedition leader, Dr. Kiew Bong Heang, stumbled on this new species in Sungai Selai when his group got lost on a trans-Endau expedition trek. It is named after him.

 
 
DIDYMOCARPUS SPP.

The soft velvety leaves of Didymocarpus falcatus quickly advertised this plant as a species new to science. Found growing on the Janing escarpment, it joins more than 50 others in the genus now known from Peninsular Malaysia. A number of these, like D. falcatus, are known from a single locality.

 
 
LOXOCARPUS TUNKUI

Loxocarpus tunkui of the African violet family is a pretty plant with gray silky leaves and small purple flowers. It grows on rock faces beside streams. It was discovered in only two places, Sungai Kinchin and Sungai Lemakaoh, and is not known to grow anywhere else in the world. It was named after Tunku Abdul Rahman, the expedition patron. In addition, ten species found in the Park have a distribution that is restricted to Johor, (including Livistona endauensis ? fan palm tree) and in the southern and eastern portion of ;Peninsular Malaysia. A journey within the Park will reveal many unusual and attractive plants, such as Ant Plants, Grapes and Wild Bananas.

 
 
LIVISTONA ENDAUENSIS

The Livistona endauensis is a fan palm species new to science. It is endemic to the Ulu Endau area. Related palms are found on other hills, like Cameron Highlands and on Gunung Tahan in the state of Pahang and on Bukit Bauk in the state of Terengganu. The species in Endau-Rompin is not only restricted to a small area, but also seems to have special habitat requirements. It reaches its maximum abundance and forms a forest only on hill tops, on shallow soils over sandstone.

 
 
ANT PLANTS

Dischidia major is an ant plant which enjoys a symbiotic relationship where both ants and plant benefit from the partnership. The ant, usually the iridomyrmex species, keeps its broods in the flask-shaped leaves. The ants also disperse the seeds. However, D. major can grow perfectly well without ants.

 
 
GRAPES

Members of one family, the obvious link between Pterisanthes stonei and the grape vine is their clambering habit. A closer look reveals similarities in the flowers and fruits, but those of P. stonei are borne on a strange, flattened red strap. This fruit-bearing strap changes from green to red as the fruits ripen. One of several Malaysian species, P. stonei was only known from three localities until its discovery at Endau-Rompin.

 
 
WILD BANANAS

Musa gracilis grows one to two metres tall and is the smallest wild banana plant in Peninsular Malaysia. An endemic species, it was thought to be very rare until it was found extensively in the Endau-Rompin area during the expedition. It has since been found to be common in Terengganu. It has potential as a garden plant as it is small, and its bananas are unusual in being almost white. In common with all wild bananas its fruits cannot be eaten because they are full of hard black seeds.

 

 
 
 

NATURE & NATIONAL PARKS - Endau-Rompin National Park

Kampung Peta - Wildlife & Floral

JOHOR - SOUTHERN REGION OF PENINSULAR MALAYSIA